MacDiarmid Institute was proud to host the sixth biennial international Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology conference; AMN6. With about 500 delegates representing more than 40 countries, the mix of single stream and parallel sessions highlighted the breadth of our research endeavours. Art, science and education shared many stages during the conference and it is rewarding to see them becoming more common bedfellows. Our conferences, like the institute itself, are aimed at getting scientists from across the AMN breadth of expertise talking to each other, articulating their science in order to elicit interest from direct experts and also to attract potential new collaborators from complementary disciplines. AMN6 marked our success, our unique international position and our leadership in creating environments that produce real collaborations.

 

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Table of contents

  • The Man Who Moved The Atom
  • Energy, Emulating Leaves and an Emmy Nomination
  • Complicated Attractions
  • Protecting Teeth With Silver
  • United Nations In A Lab
  • Chasing Synchrotron Radiation Around the World
  • Lost In Translation
  • Bio-Inspired
  • Speak, Memory
  • Creating A New Universe
  • Conferring Continues With Collaborations
  • Radical Science
  • The Man Who Moved The Atom

      If the shorthand description for Ernest Rutherford is “the man who split the atom”, Don Eigler‘s tagline has to be “the man who moved the atom”. In 1989, Don achieved a landmark in mankind’s history of building structures by demonstrating that it was possible to assemble things atom by atom. He showed this by placing 35 […]

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    Energy, Emulating Leaves and an Emmy Nomination

      Professor Daniel Nocera thinks that if the world behaved more like scientists, there’d be less war – everyone would see themselves as the part of the world, rather than individual countries. Nocera’s long and illustrious career has seen him work with many promising young scientists who now work in laboratories around the world creating […]

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    Complicated Attractions

        Imagine this; computers powerful enough to accurately predict the weather, or capable of economic modelling, or modelling how viruses will attack the body, or even how the body develops. This is the future of computation as imagined by Michelle Simmons, Physics Professor at the University of New South Wales and Director of the […]

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    Protecting Teeth With Silver

      Since arriving in New Zealand three years ago I have had the pleasure of participating in two AMN conferences. This year I was once again impressed by the high caliber of the conference, and thoroughly inspired by dynamic presentations from prominent scientists in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology. The collaborative spirit of […]

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    United Nations In A Lab

      It’s become commonplace to describe a multi-national group as a veritable United Nations, but in the case of the Magnetic Resonance Physics Group based at Victoria University the cliché holds true. With all the PhD candidates coming from overseas, and academic colleagues visiting from the US, UK, Germany, Sweden, Israel, Mexico, Japan and Australia, […]

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    Chasing Synchrotron Radiation Around the World

      What do you do when almost every piece of equipment you need for your research can only be found overseas? The answer’s pretty obvious – you go overseas. That’s what MacDiarmid Institute Associate Investigator Bridget Ingham did. After completing her PhD at Victoria, under the supervision of Professors Jeff Tallon and Alan Kaiser, she […]

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    Lost In Translation

      There are words that are used when cultures meet—collision, encounter—that draw
 the reader, the listener, towards their own conclusions—a violent act, a skirting of the issues, a lack of connectivity. Then there are lived moments that take issue with these words. Picture, if you can, Nobel Laureate Roald Hoffmann, speaking on behalf of the Advanced […]

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    Bio-Inspired

    Technological advancement may be imperative to modern civilisation, but 
we might like to keep our achievements in context; in many instances, a primitive organism has found the solution to a problem we never knew existed. Take, for instance, the sea sponge, one of several organisms to have attracted the attention of Joanna Aizenberg, Professor of […]

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    Speak, Memory

    Roald Hoffmann is Professor of Humane Letters at Cornell – a glorious destination for anyone – and a particularly marvelous title for a person whose life’s work stems from an intense belief in the power of language (letters) to convey our shared humanity. That he is a Nobel Laureate, winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry […]

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    Creating A New Universe

    To go about something as ambitious as the creation of an alternative universe, you probably wouldn’t think of starting with something as humble as a pencil. But it turns out that the graphite in the pencil lead has some rather fascinating properties that make it a better universe-building material than you might think. Graphite, as […]

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    Conferring Continues With Collaborations

    The AMN6 Conference may just have finished, but the convenor for AMN7 already has planning well underway for the next meeting.
  MacDiarmid Institute Principal Investigator Dr Shane Telfer is looking forward to welcoming delegates to Nelson in February 2015, and is currently on the hunt for the high-profile keynote speakers that have proven a drawcard […]

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    Radical Science

      “Think of polymer chains as a string of pearls,” says Krzysztof Matyjaszewski with his Polish accent, “these chains are built very quickly, approximately 1 millisecond per pearl.” Matyjaszewski is describing radical polymerisation, the process by which 50% of all polymers created commercially are produced. “This process is very difficult to control,” he says. “We wanted […]

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