From There to Where? Ensuring maximum growth, evolution and rejuvination through understanding, appreciating and acknowledging from where and how we began and ultimately greater rewards and outcomes. Can anyone doubt that the future is strongest when built on a past from which we have learnt and grown?  That moving forward happens faster when we are led and guided by the past, propelled forward by it rather than being encumbered?  By understanding our history, working with our strengths and merging these with new people and opportunities we ensure the creation of a future that ultimately delivers more.

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Table of contents

  • Inspiring The Next Generation
  • Harnessing Nature
  • Unlocking the Secrets of Cell Membranes
  • A Material World
  • OPINION: The Value of Science by Joe Trodahl
  • Simon Hall – Passive Student, Active Scientist
  • Jim Metson – Access to the Tool Kit
  • Andreas Markwitz – An Exploring Person
  • Jeff Tallon – Asking The Big Questions
  • Tackling the Science
  • Thinking Outside the Box
  • Editorial: From There to Where?
  • Chance Only Favours the Prepared Mind
  • Professor Keith Gordon – An inquisitive mind
  • Alison Downard – Taking a Circuitous Route
  • Inspiring The Next Generation

    Cather Simpson went to university to become a neurosurgeon, but found herself drawn to maths and physics instead. “Some people just 
like maths,” she says. “There’s a sort
 of internal and aesthetic satisfaction that comes from solving an equation, or describing some physical system, using what you know about maths and physics.” By the time […]

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    Harnessing Nature

    Bernd Rehm was only 15 years old when he decided he would become a microbiologist. True to his early ambitions, Professor Bernd Rehm 
is now the Chair of Microbiology at Massey University where he has spent several decades studying polymers, or, more precisely, the polymers produced in nature. Consider, for instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common […]

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    Unlocking the Secrets of Cell Membranes

    Duncan McGillivray travels a lot. When I finally manage speak to him, he is in Washington DC, but he’s just been in the UK at the Rutherford Laboratory, home to one of the world’s brightest neutron sources. That was really fun. Excellent science, with beautiful summer weather, a few pubs and cute villages in between,” he […]

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    A Material World

    John Kennedy is the father of two daughters, aged nine and five, and because I am ringing on the weekend, their cheerful voices can be heard throughout our conversation.
“I told them I had an appointment, but they still want me to play with them,” he says, laughing. Kennedy moved to New Zealand in 2001, and […]

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    OPINION: The Value of Science by Joe Trodahl

    The question put to me is “What is the value of science and innovation in/ for New Zealand?” Is my impression correct; does the word “innovation”
 in that question focus on economic advancement? In reality, innovation is required to advance science as well as the economy, and most else as well, but to me the […]

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    Simon Hall – Passive Student, Active Scientist

      Simon Hall, specialist in the use of electrochemistry for energy storage applications at Massey University, describes himself as having been a “passive student.” He was born into a family that valued science, with his father having completed a chemistry MSc at Victoria University a few years behind Alan MacDiarmid. Simon’s father worked in industry […]

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    Jim Metson – Access to the Tool Kit

    Jim Metson’s into materials – particularly surface science with a key focus on metal oxides and applications for the aluminium industry. He’s an associate director of the Light Materials Research Centre at the University of Auckland, and Deputy Dean of Science. Jim characterises his early career as “we’re doing what we do until we figure […]

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    Andreas Markwitz – An Exploring Person

      Andreas’ research, as Principal Scientist at GNS Science, focuses on silicon nanosurface interfaces, and how our understanding of new materials can be applied to industry. He is a pioneer of electron beam annealing, which can manufacture surfaces on the 1nm scale, and his work with industry has allowed him an understanding of the critical […]

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    Jeff Tallon – Asking The Big Questions

      Jeff’s internationally renowned research focuses on high-Tc superconductors (HTS), particularly the physics and materials science of HTS – thermodynamics, magnetism, electronic transport properties, novel materials, and flux pinning. He’s been a research scientist for 46 years – working through three versions of the same government body – DSIR, IRL, and now, Callaghan Innovation. During […]

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    Tackling the Science

      Natalie Plank’s vision is to develop a research platform focused on nanomaterial-based electronic devices for biosensors. Plank believes nanomaterials have enormous practical potential in
the field of medical diagnostics and mass screening techniques, but are also unpredictable – and for that reason, fascinating. Natalie took up her job as lecturer
in the School of Chemical and […]

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    Thinking Outside the Box

      Paul Kruger has bucked the trend, and gone the other way across the Tasman. “I’m originally from Melbourne,” he says. “But it’s not like I came from Australia directly to here, I came via Ireland and collected a family along the way.” He moved to Christchurch with his wife and two young children about […]

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    Editorial: From There to Where?

      Ensuring maximum growth, evolution and rejuvenation through understanding, appreciating and acknowledging from where and how we began and ultimately greater rewards and outcomes.   Can anyone doubt that the future is strongest when built on a past from which we have learnt and grown?  That moving forward happens faster when we are led and […]

    Read More

    Chance Only Favours the Prepared Mind

    Looking back at eleven years of the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology   “When you’ve got the equipment, the expertise, and the space to think about problems in a different way, the research almost tells its own story.”   Popular culture delights in the concept of scientific serendipity: Alexander Fleming discovering penicillin after […]

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    Professor Keith Gordon – An inquisitive mind

      Keith Gordon’s research focuses on molecular materials, specifically the spectroscopy of inorganic and biological systems, at the University of Otago.
He became interested in science at a very young age, with the kind of mucking about
with chemistry sets and interest in biology and
botany that characterises so many inquisitive
minds in childhood. He was encouraged to
choose chemistry […]

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    Alison Downard – Taking a Circuitous Route

      An electrochemist, with a particular interest in surface science with a nanotechnology focus, Alison Downard’s first couple of years of undergrad were in the Department of Home Science at the University of Otago. This was in the 1970s, when a home science qualification was compulsory for those interested in becoming a dietician, as she […]

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