How well connected are the pores?

MacDiarmid Institute researchers have developed a new method to track the speed with which liquids move between different pores in rocks that hold hydrocarbons. While geologists have been using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for more than a decade to probe the nuclei of atoms to learn about the porous structure of rocks that hold oil and other hydrocarbons, Professor […]

Read More

Complicated Materials and Messy Chemistry

  Ken MacKenzie, MacDiarmid Institute Principal Investigator, is a ceramics chemist. When I first heard that description it sounded like a contradiction in terms – ‘ceram­ics’ conjuring images of vases and bathroom sinks, I couldn’t see the chemistry in it. How wrong I was! According to Ken, in the last forty years the field has […]

Read More

Korea – New Zealand AMN-3 Satellite Meeting

  The high international profile created by the MacDiarmid Institute’s Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology conferences means that it has been possible for researchers with interests in certain key areas, such as the Nano- and Bionano-Technology to meet together as part of the larger conference, and to host the International Conference on Quantum Transport and Quantum […]

Read More

The Fascination of Soft Systems

  Pondering the mathematics of the building blocks of life is how physicist Dr Gerald Pereira has been spending his time as a MacDiarmid Institute Principal Investigator based at the Victoria University of Wellington, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences. Related to the relatively new field of science known as biophysics, Dr Pereira has been theoretically modelling the behaviour of soft condensed matter systems – that […]

Read More

Young Scientists Recognised

At the Foundation for Research Science and Technology 2007 Young Scientist of the Year Awards two MacDiarmid Institute funded PhD students, Conrad Lendrum and Simon Rogers, were recognised at a glittering occasion featuring Frankie Stevens as Master of Ceremonies with Louise Wallace at the Sky City Convention Centre in Auckland. Conrad Lendrum was runner up in the Understanding Planet […]

Read More

Alan MacDiarmid – Nobel Laureate – 14 April 1927 – 7 February 2007

  Alan was born in Masterton New Zealand on 14 April 1927. He attended school in the Hutt Valley near Wellington and took a Masters degree in Chemistry at Victoria College of the University of New Zealand. From there he travelled on a Fullbright Scholarship to the University of Wisconsin, where he took the first of his […]

Read More

Pollock’s Fractal Expressionism and Fractal Patterns in Nature

  The presumed rift between the arts and science has fuelled debate for decades and few people have managed to straddle the divide successfully. But there are some who do become a bit of both – scientist and artist – and bring new insights to both fields. University of Canterbury physicist Richard Taylor is one of these […]

Read More

Where Information Travels at the Speed of Light

  With a background in physics, material science and electronic engineering, Professor Chennupati Jagadish combines most of the skills required for a distinguished career in nanotechnology; most, but not all. “The only regret I have about my background is a wish I’d studied a bit more biology. Because of the fact that nanotechnology is such a multidisciplinary field, […]

Read More

The Asian Technology Forum

  The Forum was held at National Taiwan University 14 – 16 June 2007 and I attended on behalf of the MacDiarmid Institute with the primary intention of representing us at this forum and getting up to speed with what is happening in Asia in this area. It is clear that there is a strong […]

Read More

AMN-3

  The third international conference on advanced materials and nanotechnology — AMN-3 was held in Wellington 11 – 16 February 2007. Conference organisation was flawless in the dedicated and tireless hands of conference Chair, Kathryn McGrath. There was a remarkable increase in attendance at the conference by 170 compared to AMN-1 (2003) and 100 compared to AMN-2 (2005). That the attendance […]

Read More

Organocatalysis – very trendy!

  In the heart of the periodic table sits a group of elements which most people would instantly recognise, but more than likely take for granted. This is not surprising – many of the transition metals, including iron, nickel, copper, silver and gold, are so familiar, so ordinary, that it is hard to imagine that they could be at […]

Read More

One Day in the Life – Profiles of three extraordinary PhD students – Rueben Mendelsberg, Sam Yu and Phill Anderson

  Michele Taylor Rueben Mendelsberg speaks with a distinct Denver accent. He wears a manaia-shaped greenstone around his neck and celebrates Yom Kippur. He rides a unicycle, fishes for trout and loves lasers. About fifteen years ago, his art professor father brought one home as an objet d’art. It was a plastic plug-in model: one foot long and four inches in diameter. “I loved […]

Read More