Nanocamp 2010

  Twelve students took part in the 2010 MacDiarmid Institute week-long Nanocamp held at Canterbury University. The students not only learned about nanosciences and how chemists, biologists, physicists and engineers are working together, but they have also been exposed to the most advanced facilities and equipment that the MacDiarmid institute has supported and funded. Camp co-ordinator, […]

Read More

University of Leipzig collaborator visit

Dr Damian Rybicki, Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Leipzig, visited MacDiarmid Principal Investigators at IRL from 18 February to 18 March 2010. Damian’s visit was part of an ongoing collaboration with the magnetic resonance group at Leipzig University. During his visit Damian acquired a number of useful skills including, how to make […]

Read More

Cost Strategic Workshop: Principles and Development of Bio-Inspired Materials, April 2010, Vienna Austria

  COST is an intergovernmental European framework for international cooperation between nationally funded research activities. COST creates scientific networks and enables scientists to collaborate in a wide spectrum of activities in research and technology. New Zealand is a non-funded partner, as such New Zealand cannot initiate an action but it is able to join an action. […]

Read More

Himmelbjergegnens Natur-og Idrætsefterskole

As a PhD student in my first year at Victoria University of Wellington, my research is primarily focused on modeling the melting of small gallium clusters (30-55 atoms). I recently had the pleasure of embarking on a two-continent, monthplus journey as part of my PhD professional development. I started the journey visiting our experimental counterparts […]

Read More

New Zealand – Taiwan Symposium on Bio-nanotechnologies and MacDiarmid Institute BioNanoNetwork (BNN) Meeting

The joint New Zealand – Taiwan Symposium on Bionanotechnologies and the MacDiarmid Institute BioNanoNetwork (BNN) annual meeting was held in April 2010 in Wellington and in Christchurch, organized by Richard Tilley and Maan Alkaisi. The symposium was sponsored by the NZ Ministry of Research, Science & Technology, National Science Council, Taiwan and the MacDiarmid Institute BioNanoNetwork. Dr […]

Read More

Zooming In

If nano-sized machines and devices are to be part of our future world, research into the basic electronic properties of these miniscule systems is a prerequisite. However, most questions are impossible to investigate, let alone answer, through experiments alone and require the input of theoretical physicists such as Michele Governale. Governale joined Victoria University’s School of […]

Read More

Martin Lord Rees: Rutherford Lecturer 2010

  Martin Lord Rees, is Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics and Master of Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. He holds the honorary title of Astronomer Royal and also Visiting Professor at Imperial College London and at Leicester University. In 2005 he was appointed to the House of Lords and elected President of the Royal […]

Read More

Catching the bug of enquiry

Buddy Nuku found the advertisement for the Discovery Awards on the Internet. He told his Chemistry teacher and he and three others at Heretaunga College in Upper Hutt were accepted to take part in the programme. For Buddy it was life transforming. The Discovery Awards are the MacDiarmid Institute’s annual outreach programme for Years 12 […]

Read More

Networks

An MIT student’s “summer” project at MacDiarmid shows researchers are collaborating more as the Institute grows. Visiting researcher Virginia Nicholson is an undergraduate student in physics and maths at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She first visited New Zealand when she was 12 years old, and has been searching for a reason to return ever […]

Read More

The Glittering Prizes

The MacDiarmid Institute is proud to be associated with the following outstanding individuals and to congratulate them on being recognised for their work. Professor Sir Paul Callaghan was awarded the prestigious international Günther Laukien prize. The prize was for his groundbreaking work on  Magnetic resonance. Nobel Laureate Richard Ernst, who chaired the prize commitee praised Sir Paul’s […]

Read More

Alan MacDiarmid Building Opens

The Alan MacDiarmid Building at Victoria University of Wellington was opened on 21 July by the Prime Minister Hon John Key.  Hon Wayne Mapp, Hon Steven Joyce and Mayor Kerry Prendergast also attended the function and met with mebers of Alan’s family and friends.   On the day following the building opening event the MacDiarmid Institute […]

Read More

Peering Inside Nanopores

“We make money from invisible holes.  But we can’t afford to be invisible.” Hans van der Voorn, Executive Chairman of nanotechnology start-up firm Izon, spreads out a series of brochures highlighting his company’s brightly-coloured, cheerful-looking devices, each housing its trademark nanopore technology. “We made a conscious decision not to have any grey instruments. It’s a little unusual, […]

Read More

A Measure of Science

I launched my blog A Measure of Science on sciblogs.co.nz when the site went live in September 2009. Since then I have written more than fifty posts. I probably spend about 3-4 hours per week blogging. Thanks to google analytics I can see that people do read it, although some articles attract considerably more readers than […]

Read More

Ever Wondered?

  Dr John Watt is hosting a TVNZ7 Science show “Ever Wondered?” presented in partnership with the Royal Society of New Zealand”. John searches for answers to today’s most challenging scientific questions by dropping in on Kiwi scientists and researchers and joining in on high-tech and at times hair-raising experiments dealing with natural disasters to food […]

Read More

Cool Catalysis

Almost every chemical reaction relies on a little help from a friend – a molecule which facilitates it without changing its own shape or composition. Without such catalysts life as we know it would be impossible and everything from the human body to large industrial processes would grind to a halt. Despite its importance catalysis […]

Read More