Architecture of the very small

  An ancient cathedral that has taken hundreds of labourers and artisans  decades to build inspires awe in many of us, but we often remain oblivious to the elegant construction effort that goes on on a much smaller scale and with seemingly little effort. It literally happens by itself, mostly unnoticed. Molecular self-assembly is widespread […]

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New Principal Investigators

  Following the call for applications for new Principal Investigator positions in the MacDiarmid Institute 7 appointments were made to commence on 01 January 2010. They are: Martin Allen Martin in based at the University of Canterbury. His research interests are: The physical properties and device applications of metal oxide semiconduc­tors (in particular the oxides […]

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Lighting up the World

  As your eye ages, the proteins in your lens starts to yellow, colouring your world to a darker, redder hue, with often a resulting depressive effect in your mood. What if a change in household lighting could make your world, not just a brighter place, but one which gave you back the colours of […]

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Symposium 2009

In December last year 58 students and post doctorates from all over the MacDiarmid Institute gathered at Auckland University for the annual student symposium, one of the most important dates in the MacDiarmid community calendar. The aim of the symposium is to strengthen the links between partner organisations in the Institute and to foster friendships […]

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Asia Nano Forum (ANF) – Asia Nanocamp 2009

  Asia Nano Forum (ANF) is an organization consist­ing of a network of nanotechnology institutes in the Asia region. Formed in 2004, the purpose of ANF is to actively promote excellence in research, development and also the uptake and commercialization of nanote­chnology in the region. This collective body aims to create benefits in participant economies, […]

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The 2009 Asian Science Camp

The idea of the Asian Science Camp was discussed in 2005 at the Lindau Science Meeting in Germany by Professor Yuan-Tseh Lee from Taiwan the 1986 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Professor Masatoshi Koshiba from Japan, the 2002 Nobel Laureate in Physics. The proposal aims to enlighten those science-talented youths through discussions and personal contact […]

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In the Spirit of the Fulbright Programme

  In August 2008 I went to the US for 11 months as part of the Fulbright programme. I spent five months at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and the rest at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). This stint was an eye-opener, both culturally and academi­cally, with plenty of interesting experiences. Most […]

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Is it possible to make money from science in New Zealand?

  “As I sail my boat in Auckland harbour and look at the skyline of the central business district I don’t see any businesses based on science,” said entrepreneur Dr Brett Wells at the recent MacDiarmid symposium. “What I see are mostly service industries. Without the big technology companies or venture capitalists, like they have […]

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Life after leading MacDiarmid – a catch-up with Paul Callaghan

  It might catch you off guard to hear the way Prof Sir Paul Callaghan talks about his recent bout with cancer. “‘Why is this happening to me?’ That thought never crossed my mind. Of course it’s happening to me,” says Sir Paul, calmly pushing back from the table in his office overlooking Wellington harbour. […]

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MacDiarmid Young Scientist of the Year Award and the Prime Minister’s Emerging Scientist Prize

John Watt, a PhD student working with Richard Tilley, was named the 2009 MacDiarmid Young Scientist of the Year. His research could result in a cheap and effective way of removing toxic pollutants from vehicle emissions. His prize included $15,000 in cash, a trip to an international conference and the prestigious MacDiarmid medal. John was […]

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