In The Media

Jun
27

Tell me about your Thesis

MacDiarmid Institute PhD student Leo Browning manipulates nano-wires to make neural networks that behave like living neurons. His thesis focuses on the production of nanowire based neural networks and methods for their application in sensor and logic devices, and integrating networks to tune their behaviour.The long-term goal for this research is to explore electronics that […]

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May
11

Industry speed-dating – video and media coverage

The Interface Industry Challenge is a new joint initiative conceived by the MacDiarmid Institute and the Dodd-Walls Centre, under which scientists from two Centres of Research Excellence (CoREs) tackle real world problems faced by New Zealand companies. “We wanted to extend our partnerships with industry. Asking industry to set problems for the Dodd-Walls Centre and […]

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Nanodiamonds may replace common techniques to administer drugs

Amanda Barnard, speaker at AMN8 Queenstown, works on how nanodiamonds may be used to control where and how much of a drug is administered within the human body. Read more

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AMN8 Outreach

680 secondary school students came along to hear and be inspired by David Leigh in Christchurch. An enthusiastic crowd of 200 people turned up to listen to Henry Snaith and Justin Hodgkiss at the Royal Society in Wanaka. Shotover Primary School kids loved having Albert Folch along, teaching science through soccer. The Women in Science […]

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Mar
24

TV clip – women nanoscientists at AMN8

Channel 39 clip features women nanoscientists at AMN8 – ‘Scientists flock to Queenstown for biggest conference in Southern Hemisphere’. Read more

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Nanoparticles may be used as drug carriers within the human body

Silvia Giordani, speaker at AMN8 Queenstown, works on nanoparticles and their medical applications. Read more

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The MacDiarmid Institute faciliates the New Zealand nano-revolution

Director of the MacDiarmid Institute, Professor Thomas Nann, associate Professor Justin Hodgkiss, and post-doctoral fellow Dr Renee Goreham give an overview over the MacDiarmid Institute’s research activities. Read more

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Mar
22

AMN8: Molecular machines

David Leigh, plenary speaker at AMN8 Queenstown, builds machines that can work on the scale of DNA sized molecules. Read more He also talked to RadioNZ about these ‘molecular machines’. Read more       Here he works his magic on students from Burnside High School and other Christchurch schools.     Picture Source: University of […]

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Mar
22

AMN8: From science to spinoff companies

Associate Professor Justin Hodgkiss shares his experiences in founding a company based on research that was conducted in his group. Read more

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Mar
22

AMN8: Science for kids

During his visit of AMN8 Queenstown, Bioengineer Albert Folch tried to catch interest in science of local children. Read more Picture Source: TheSpinoff.co.nz

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AMN8: Unfolding of proteins

Professor Colin Raston, speaker at AMN8 Queentown, talks about how the ‘Vortex Fluid Device’ may unfold proteins. Read more

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Mar
22

AMN8: Silver nano particles in gel solution to fight tooth decay

Dr Carla Meledandri, principal investigator of the MacDiarmid Institute at the University of Otago, has found a way to use charged antibacterial silver nanocomposite structures ‘to sterilise dentine prior to the placement of a dental restorative material’ (publication). Read more

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Mar
22

Searching for high temperature superconductors

Superconductors already have various applications (electromagnets, digital circuits, particle detectors) but would be even more usefull if they operated at higher temperatures. They would be a revolution to power grids and how power is generated and distributed around the world. And they would make all other current applications cheaper and safer. Ben Mallett, research fellow at the University of […]

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Mar
22

AMN8: Conductive polymers may serve as power source

Rachel Segalman, speaker at AMN8 Queenstown, talks about the thermoelectric potential of polymers. Due to their inherent thermal conductivity, polymers might generate power through external heat gradients. The process also works in reverse so that they may be used as heaters or refrigerators, too. Read more Picture source: Segelman Group Website 

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Mar
22

AMN8: Perovskite solar cells might surpass current Silicon technology

Professor Henry Snaith, plenary speaker at AMN8 Queenstown, has a vision of how Perovskites shape the future of photovoltaic power generation. Read more Professor Snait also spoke about Perovskites on RadioNZ. Read more Rebecca Sutton and Jesse Allardice, former Victoria University of Wellington students and now PhD students at Oxford and Cambridge, also talk about how […]

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Mar
22

AMN8 Queenstown: Women in Science panel

Three female nanoscientists discuss their lives and work at the ‘AMN8 Trio – Women in Science panel’ – a public engagement event held in Queenstown during AMN8 in February 2017. Read more

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Mar
22

Coatings of nanopillars may double the speed of ships

MacDiarmid Institute International Science Advisory Board member Professor Thomas Schimmel spoke to Jesse Mulligan at RadioNZ about the Salvinia fern and how its properties might enable them to build ‘ships that will never get wet’. Read more Picture Source: Wikipedia

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Vision Matauranga – Workshop at Rotorua’s Whakarewarewa Village

MacDiarmid PI and GNS scientist Andreas Markwitz has organised an international workshop at Rotorua’s Whakarewarewa Village focussing on ion beam analysis in commercial environments. GNS has been working with Rototua’s Whakarewarewa Village since 2014, using ion beam analysis to explore air quality issues and the implications of polluted air. Rotorua Daily Post

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Aug
11

MacDiarmid Deputy Director Nicola Gaston talks with Kathryn Ryan about the science of stuff used to make things

MacDiarmid Deputy Director Nicola Gaston talks with Kathryn Ryan about the science of stuff used to make things Listen to the Podcast on RadioNZ  

By Christoph Hasenoehrl | In The Media . Newsroom
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Aug
11

MacDiarmid Investigators Cather Simpson and David Williams discuss how materials science is changing the way farmers analyse milk – Our Changing World

MacDiarmid Investigators Cather Simpson and David Williams discuss how materials science is changing the way farmers analyse milk – Our Changing World Listen to the Podcast on RadioNZ

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Jun
02

Engender Technology wins in AgTech, World Cup Tech Challenge

The Directors of the two Centres of Research Excellence, the MacDiarmid Institute and the Dodd-Walls Centre, today both congratulated Associate Professor Cather Simpson on her company winning the AgTech section of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.  Associate Professor Simpson is a Principal Investigator with both Centres of Research Excellence.  The Director of […]

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May
24
May
24

Cather Simpson’s start-up company Engender Technology shortlisted for the World Cup Tech Challenge

New Zealand tech start-up company named as finalist for World Cup Tech Challenge led by MacDiarmid Institute and Dodd-Walls Centre Principal Investigator, 14 May 2016 Listen to the Cather’s interview with Kim Hill on Saturday Mornings at RadioNZ: Vote here The MacDiarmid Institute and Dodd-Walls Centre congratulated Associate Professor Cather Simpson, a Principal Investigator in […]

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Feb
24

Building electronics atom by atom

Victoria University of Wellington has unveiled a unique piece of equipment used to make everyday electronics by layering atoms on top of each other very precisely. The research equipment—Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)—creates solid materials by depositing atom by atom, and is the only system of its kind in New Zealand. Victoria’s School of Chemical and […]

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Oct
12

Why nanotech is sexier than ever

Professor Thomas Nann recently took up his new post as director of New Zealand’s renowned MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology. He answered these questions from the Herald. You recently arrived in Wellington following a tenure as director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility. Can you tell us about the kind of work that […]

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Jul
13

Open source electric car

One of The MacDiarmid Institute’s postdoctoral fellows, Dr Stefan Andreas Meyer, talks to Radio New Zealand about his project to design and build an open source electric car, which he details at Blitz Conversions Limited. Radio New Zealand: Open source electric car interview

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Jul
09

The bionic eye is here!

Kiwi brainpower behind the gift of sight.  Two Kiwi scientists, one being MacDiarmid alumnus Dr David Garrett, are helping to give a very special gift to the blind over in Australia. Bionic eye on TVNZ show Seven Sharp  

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Jul
04

TV3: Chemistry show illuminates science behind light

A visiting chemistry teaching fellow from the University of Cambridge has brought his bag of tricks to New Zealand in a bid to show it’s more than just a flash in the pan. Dr Peter Wothers, who has an MBE for services to chemistry, is in the country with the Chemistry of Light Show filled […]

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Jun
21

Podcast: People Behind The Science – Kate McGrath

People Behind the Science’s mission is to inspire current and future scientists, share the different paths to a successful career in science, educate the general population on what scientists do, and show the human side of science. In each episode, a different scientist will guides the listener through their journey by sharing their successes, failures, and […]

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Jun
04

Professor Kate McGrath: Time for a change in funding research

This op-ed by The MacDiarmid Institute’s Director Professor Kate McGrath, originally appeared in The Dominion Post and The Press on Monday 1st June 2015.  Success rates of less than 10 percent for competitive government funding programmes are becoming commonplace in New Zealand. Sometimes these plummet as low as 5 percent. This is a matter of […]

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Jun
01

Dr Michelle Dickinson in Queen’s Birthday Honours

Her alter ego’s name, “Nano Girl”, was coined by schoolchildren but top scientist Dr Michelle Dickinson may be more of a superhero than she gives herself credit for. The Auckland University nanotechnologist’s tireless efforts to get Kiwis hooked on science, kids especially, have earned her a Queen’s Birthday Honour. It comes after she was awarded […]

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May
20

Margaret Brimble: Kiwi professor wins global chemistry award

A leading New Zealand chemistry professor has scooped up a global award for being an outstanding achiever in her field. Distinguished Professor Margaret Brimble of the University of Auckland was named as one of this year’s Distinguished Women in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering. She is the first New Zealander to be named for the award. […]

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May
20

Dr Nicola Gaston – Exploring latest advances in science

How to melt a teaspoon in a cup of tea and how chemistry can help unlock new wine markets are among innovative scientific developments people will be able to learn about at a free talk in the Masterton Town Hall next week. Chemistry and physics experts from the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences at […]

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May
20

Seven Sharp: Meet Michelle – The Science Superhero

TVNZ’s Seven Sharp featured MacDiarmid Institute Associate Investigator Dr Michelle Dickinson who’s trying to bust stereotypes and change what we all think about science! Watch the full clip HERE!

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May
08

Making a Splash on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

Dr Geoff Willmott from the Departments of Physics and Chemistry at The University of Auckland is using a Marsden Fund grant to study the asymmetry of drop splashes on extremely water-repellent superhydrophobic surfaces, to link structure to function, using high speed photography.   Read the full story at The Royal Society of New Zealand. 

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Apr
17

Funding boost will help joint science projects with iwi groups

Project leader (MacDiarmid Institute Principal Investigator) Andreas Markwitz, of GNS Science, said findings would lead to an improved understanding of the health effects of volcanic eruptions and geothermal events in the central North Island. “The improved knowledge and understanding will help to underpin health monitoring and support geothermal and Māori tourism. It will also help […]

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Apr
17

Publons pair get scientific publishing moving faster

Frustrated by the glacial pace of academic research, Daniel Johnston and MacDiarmid Institute Alumnus Andrew Preston decided to propel scientific publishing into the 21st century. Everybody thinks of science as moving at a blistering pace, but it’s actually one of the most technologically challenged industries out there,” Johnston says. Preston was working as a physicist […]

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Mar
12

Auckland Arts Festival: ‘An extravaganza of explosions’

Dr Michelle Dickinson loves science and has dedicated her life to it. In fact, the senior engineering lecturer at the University of Auckland is so keen to share with the world her love for the discipline, she’s set her own hand on fire – by lighting a harmless-looking pile of methane-filled bubbles. Not as some […]

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Mar
03

Ruth Knibbe: Using a Scanning Electron Microscope

Materials engineer Dr Ruth Knibbe uses a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to image her own samples and samples for other scientists. Unlike a light microscope, an SEM uses a focused beam of electrons to produce images from the top surface of a sample. “So you don’t get lots of information from the bulk of your sample, […]

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Feb
10

Science meets art in nanophotography

A series of compelling photos of the nano-sized world hopes to raise the public’s fascination. The Small Matters event at Nelson’s Provincial Museum offers 50 works on the scale of a billionth of a meter in size, organiser Simon Brown said. “Giving people an insight into what really is a different world – the world […]

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Dec
08

‘Nanogirl’ wins science communication award

This year’s Prime Minister’s Science Prize for Science Communication has been awarded to Dr Michelle Dickinson, capping off a prize-winning year for the University of Auckland engineering lecturer. Dr Dickinson, a senior lecturer in Chemical & Materials Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering and Associate Investigator of The MacDiarmid Institute, was also named Science Communicator of […]

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Dec
04

A Place To Live – Full RNZ recordings

In November 2014, The MacDiarmid Institute hosted a forum called A Place to Live : for the life worth having in Whanganui focussed on the link between economic and environmental health in New Zealand, in particular in the regions and smaller centres. Kim Hill chaired the event, which featured a number of talks and panel […]

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Nov
26

NZ scientist discoveres Rhett drug

An Auckland University scientist has discovered a drug to treat a crippling brain disease that affects thousands of women worldwide. Margaret Brimble and her team made the break-through that if approved will be the first New Zealand discovery registered by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Prof Brimble said the FDA might fast-track […]

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Nov
24

Forum focuses on nature’s role

The children who race down Victoria Ave on their scooters to get to school struck journalist Rod Oram as an indicator of the good life in Wanganui. He was one of the 40-plus speakers at the A Place to Live conference last week. It started with Dame Anne Salmond’s lecture on Sunday night and finished […]

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Nov
13

3D molecular sponges

Hydrogen has been touted as one alternative to fossil fuels, but for planes or even cars to run on hydrogen, the gas needs to be stored in large quantities. One method for storing hydrogen and other gases are materials called metal-organic frameworks (or MOFs), which are a bit like 3D molecular sponges or sieves. “The […]

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Nov
13

Tech hubs will help regional life survive

Technology and innovation hubs are lifelines for regions like Northland, according to a researcher behind an economic and environmental three-day conference in Whanganui this weekend, which will see two Northlanders speak about one successful regional project. Northland Regional Council chairperson Bill Shepherd will join manager of Reconnecting Northland and keynote speaker, David Mules, at A […]

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Oct
30

Detecting Oestrogen in the Environment

A team of researchers at Victoria University of Wellington have developed a novel sensor that can detect tiny amounts of the hormone oestrogen in environmental samples. Ken McNatty from the School of Biological Sciences is interested in ways of detecting environmental contaminants. “Currently we don’t have sensitive methods of detecting environmental contaminants, so my interest […]

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Oct
30

Protein Nano-LEGO

“We are really interested in making things smaller these days,” says PhD student Amy Yewdall from the University of Canterbury. “And we’re thinking of proteins as a nanomaterial that we can use as building blocks for future machines, so you’ve got nanomachines that we can make, or biosensors.” In particular, Amy is working with proteins called […]

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Oct
16

Marae keen to start up incubator

One of New Zealand’s most distinguished science bodies has formed an alliance with Wanganui’s Te Hononga Marae Trust. The director of the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Kate McGrath, said the two signed a memorandum of understanding three weeks ago at Patiarero Marae on the Whanganui River. A former student of the institute, […]

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Oct
04

Trust and Science Institute Join Forces

A Whanganui charitable trust has signed a partnership with a top New Zealand research institute which it hopes will produce more Maori scientists. Nga Hononga Marae Trust has signed a memorandum of understanding with The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology. The manager of the trust said the two organisations will undertake community-based science […]

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Sep
30

It’s getting easier to be green

Organised by Victoria University and the MacDiarmid Institute, the A Place to Live conference honours the memory of Whanganui’s Sir Paul Callaghan, the 2011 New Zealander of the Year, focusing on the economies and environments of small towns and regions. Source: The Wanganui Chronicle Story by Nicola Young. It’s getting easier to be green

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Sep
05

Women of Influence Profiled

Four MacDiarmind Institute Investigators; Margaret Brimble, Michelle Dickinson, Nicola Gaston and Kathryn McGrath have been shortlisted in the Fairfax Media and Westpac Women of Excellence Awards. The Innovation and Science category recognises women who are driving innovation within a business, workplace or community, through their work in the sciences, medicine, academia, IT and biotechnology, finance, engineering or in organisational design and management.    Source: […]

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Sep
05

Hi Ho Silver Lining

“Fusing gold and silver with wool sounds like something from the ancient Greek legend of Jason and the Golden Fleece. In twenty-first century New Zealand, it’s an idea that agri-science firm Noble Bond thinks has the potential to save New Zealand’s ailing wool industry.” Unlimited Magazine has published a significant story about Professor Jim Johnston […]

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Aug
15

Science forum targets young minds

Professor offers advice to schoolgirls and says discipline needs to attract ‘women who will make a difference’ You only live once – so do what you love.” While hardly rocket science, the advice was just as important as anything else one of our most accomplished chemists could impart to the next generation of female researchers […]

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Aug
14

Sarah Thompson: How Red Pigments Fade

One of the striking features in paintings like the Girl with a Pearl Earring by Jan Vermeer (1632-1675) is the red pigments, in this case the madder lake used in her lips. But these red pigments have a tendency to fade. Sarah Thompson, a MacDiarmid Institute PhD student from the University of Auckland, is using […]

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Jul
03

Dickinson & Branson Talk Sustainablilty

The MacDiarmid Institute’s Michelle Dickinson went on a whirlwind trip to Necker Island to join Richard Branson and other great minds from the worlds of business and science.  During the week-long networking event, sustainable solutions for growth using kiwi science and technology were discussed. Read more on NZ Herald     Watch Michelle talk about her experience […]

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Jul
01

Bright future for solar ahead

Expect to see a solar PV panel on the north-facing surface of every building in the future. The rapidly falling cost of converting sunlight into electricity means it’s just a matter of time before solar power generation is part of the structure of new buildings. At the same time, the development of new photovoltaic materials […]

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Jun
22

Sisters are doing it together

One of the most motivating pieces of advice scientist Dr Nicola Gaston ever received was being told how to dress. It was 2012, and Gaston was leaving her job at Industrial Research Ltd to take up a lecturing post at Victoria University. She was invited to give a farewell address and discuss her scientific work. […]

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May
08

Millions in funding for new CoREs of learning

The Tertiary Education Commission has today revealed the six Centres of Research Excellence (CoRES) which will get access to millions of dollars in funding. The CoREs fund – established in 2001 to encourage the development of excellent tertiary education-based research – provides operating expenditure of just under $210 million over six years, with funding beginning […]

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May
08

Funding confirmed for new CoREs

The Tertiary Education Commission has revealed the six Centres of Research Excellence, including The MacDiarmid Institute. The Tertiary Education Commission has revealed the six Centres of Research Excellence, including The MacDiarmid Institute, which will get access to millions of dollars in funding. “Our focus is on delivering excellent research and education, inspiring New Zealanders, training New […]

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May
02

Dickinson a “STEM superstar”

PBS (America) has profiled MacDiarmid Institute Associate Investigator Dr Michelle Dickinson as one of the “best and brightest” STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) superstars. “Knowing that what you do can make a difference to the world’s future and you can help to solve big issues is one of the more humbling aspects of STEM, and it […]

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Apr
04

Lasers Solve Dairy Sperm Problem

Principal Investigator Associate Professor Cather Simpson and the team at the University of Auckland’s Photon Factory, a high-tech laser research hub, have conducted artificial insemination research which has led to discovering a process for sorting sperm cells according to sex. The New Zealand Herald’s Simon Eskow reports. Read More

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Mar
25

Biobead Vaccines

At Massey University, Bernd Rehm and his team at PolyBatics are using bacteria as factories to produce tiny bioplastic beads which are genetically engineered to display designer molecules on the surface. These molecules are disease-specific antigens so when they are injected into the body they can generate immunity. Some of the vaccines being developed could […]

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Mar
18

Women in Science

More women than ever are stepping into labs, but few of them are making it to science’s highest offices. In an article featuring two Principal Investigators from The MacDiarmid Institute – Dr Nicola Gaston and Distinguished Professor Margaret Brimble – science reporter Jamie Morton looks at what can be done to close the gender gap.  Related article Nicola […]

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Feb
04

Kate McGrath Discusses Outreach Initiatives

The MacDiarmid Institute’s director, Professor Kate McGrath spoke with Radio New Zealand’s Kathryn Ryan about the Institute’s commitment to help train and equip teachers to confidently teach science at all levels from Early Childhood up, through initiatives like the Korero with Scientists programme. Kate also discussed the other outreach projects The MacDiarmid Institute is championing, […]

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Dec
17

Get Off The Grass!

  In “Get Off The Grass!” (Auckland University Press) Shaun Hendy and Paul Callaghan take a quantitative look at how innovation works both in New Zealand and around the world. They show that economic geography plays a key role in determining rates of innovation and productivity. If New Zealand is to grow its economy more rapidly […]

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Dec
16

Million Dollar Boost

Hands up if you think it’s high time someone came up with a battery that’s cheaper and more sustainable than the ones you can currently buy? A research team at Massey University has been awarded nearly $1 million to do just that. SOURCE: Idealog.co.nz Further Reading: Long Life In Battery Development Futher Reading: Simon Hall: […]

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Dec
16

Sector Pins Hopes on Golden Fleece

A golden yarn developed by Kiwi scientists and containing pure gold is expected to be sold to wealthy buyers of luxury carpets, rugs and furnishings.  Unlike the golden fleece in Greek mythology the yarn and completed woollen products will not have a golden colour at this stage. The Aulana-branded wool has been developed by Professor […]

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Dec
16

Izon

“Izon Science designs and manufactures precision instrumentation for nano- and micro-scale particle analysis. The instrument systems, the qNano and qViro-X, are now in use in a wide range of research institutes and universities around the world.” www.izon.com Izon Sciences has benefited greatly from MacDiarmid work addressing the mechanisms of particle transport through nanopores (research conducted by […]

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Beam Me Up Scotty

Deep in the heart of The University of Auckland’s Science Faculty, amazing advancements are taking place with lasers at the Photon Factory.  If that sounds like something straight out of Star Trek, in reality, the work of Director Cather Simpson and her students and staff is scarcely less remarkable. Read More

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Nov
25

Big Results, Tiny Particles

Nanoparticles are attracting worldwide scientific interest because of their potential applications, particularly in the fields of biomedical research and industrial processes. “Our goal is to use them to benefit science and, ultimately, mankind,” says The MacDiarmid Institute’s Richard Tilley. SOURCE: “Victorious” – Victoria University of Wellington.   Read More

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Nov
25

Meet NanoGirl

Dr Michelle Dickinson is an Associate Investigator for The MacDiarmid Institute who aspires to be a real life Superhero! Michelle strongly believes that everyone should have access to science and learning about how things around you work, regardless of who you are or what your education level is. Watch her exciting Ted X talk about […]

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Nov
20

Fish Eyes Used to Detect Disease

University of Canterbury researchers (lead byThe MacDiarmid Institute’s Juliet Gerrard) are using discarded fish eyes to help develop sensors that will detect health problems in humans. SOURCE: The Press Read More

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Nov
20

Five Days of Intense NanoScience

Two New Plymouth students have been chosen to attend an exclusive “nanocamp” science programme at The MacDiarmid Institute in January.  Source: Taranaki Daily News Online Read More

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Nov
20

He Is Ion Man

The simplest way to describe what Andreas Markwitz and his team have done is that they’ve developed a ray gun that makes metal magically stronger. SOURCE: The Dominion Post Read More

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Nov
20

Cather Simpson Wins Award for Excellence In Teaching

The MacDiarmid Institute’s Cather Simpson, Associate Professor at the University of Auckland, has a passion for putting science in the hands of the learners, coupled with a strong commitment to diversity.  She recently won an awards for Sustained Excellence in Tertiary Teaching.   SOURCE: National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence Further Reading: Beam Me Up […]

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Nov
20

Nicola Gaston on Sexism in Science

The MacDiarmid Institute’s Dr Nicola Gaston speaks with Radio New Zealand’s Bryan Crump about sexism in science.  SOURCE: Radio New Zealand Nicola’s Blog Why Science Is Sexist Read More

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Nov
20

National Science Challenges

  The MacDiarmid Institute’s Director, Professor Kate McGrath speaks to Radio New Zealand about the missed opportunities in the New Zealand Government’s recently announced “National Science Challenges.” SOURCE: Radio New Zealand : National   Read More

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Aug
28

Pounamu In The Media

Full media release can be found here. Game Day media release can be found here. Pounamu has appreciated coverage from the following websites/publications Radio New Zealand – http://www.radionz.co.nz/audio/player/2567478 Harakeke Hub – Children at Amesbury School. TechDay NZ Science Teacher Gravida Te Papa SciBlogs EsocSci Science Learn Social Media Join the event on Facebook follow the #Pounamu tag on Twitter […]

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Nov
25

Implant project proves winner

Scientist and chemistry professor Kate McGrath has been awarded $50,000 from economic development agency Grow Wellington to further her research into creating lighter and more durable joint replacements. Source: The Dominion Post 

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