The Best 100 Science Experiments – Round 2!

The Best 100 Science Experiments – Round 2!

Children need to engage with science as early as possible; the more science the better, for them and society. “Presenting science in ways that give students the same sense of excitement and challenge that motivates grown-up scientists is important” says The MacDiarmid Institute’s Deputy Director Stakeholder Engagement Professor Alison Downard, “that’s the thinking behind our involvement with primary and early childhood education.” Working in partnership with NZEI Te Riu Roa, The MacDiarmid Institute has two initiatives tackling the challenges of increasing participation in science at primary schools and early childhood education centres; The Best 100 Science Experiments, and the Korero with a Scientist project. The Best 100 Science Experiments is a project created by The MacDiarmid Institute and supported by NZEI Te Riu Roa which continues to build up a bank of one hundred teacher and student friendly experiments for the classroom. Round two is now open for submissionS! Primary and ECE teachers are invited to submit their favourite simple, fun and fail-safe experiments which use readily available equipment. All successful experiments will go into the prize draw; five teachers will win an iPad for both themselves and their classroom.  Photos and videos of the experiments in progress while not compulsory, would be very much appreciated. The Best 100 Science Experiments Round 2 Entry Form This year, we are asking teachers to especially consider how their experiments promote or support the five science capabilities recently introduced to the curriculum. Last year’s winning experiments can be found in The Learning Hub.   DEADLINE EXTENSION! Entries now close Friday November 28 2014. Media and general enquiries can be directed to kylie.docherty @ vuw.ac.nz  

In her article Unlocking the idea of capabilities in science,” Dr Rosemary Hipkins of NZCER explains why the capabilities were developed (what they are supposed to “do” in terms of teaching and learning), why they were called that, and how they fit in with the curriculum’s key competencies.